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  • #10805
    Inara84
    Participant

    In chapter one, the section “Create Images Intentionally for Black and Brown Children” is a topic that resonate with me because as a child I too experienced the beliefs his older son had. I remember as a young girl in 2nd or 3rd grade that I wanted to be white. I was sitting in the living room with my mother and I looked up at her and told her “ Mom, I wish I was white because I hate my hair and how I look.” She would then ask me why did I feel that way. I told her that people would always make fun of my dark skin and short hair. They would tell me that they did not want to be my friend anymore because I didn’t have long hair or because I was too dark. The sad part about this is that it was Black or African Americans telling me this. I also remember adults would make jokes about my dark skin and treat the children with lighter complexion better. After I explained to her why I felt that way, she gave me a hug and told me that I am beautiful the way I am and that God does not make mistakes. If they can’t see how amazing you then they don’t deserve you as a friend. I strongly agree with Dr. Eric Mason and his wife with exposing their son to positive Black images and global culture. I too enjoy diversity and learning about different cultures. It took me a while to understand and now as an adult I’m embracing my natural hair and love the skin I’m in. I’m so happy to see more representation of women embracing their natural hair. I believe allowing young children to see positive images of people who look like them will embark them on a great journey of self love.

    #10824
    mrpullam
    Keymaster

    I think that what you have written ties perfectly into the lesson for chapter 1. Unfortunately, society as a whole (even people of color) has been taught to believe that whiteness is pure and desirable and blackness is unwanted and dismissable. This is why it is important for us to engage in studies like this one. By understanding our history and intentionally taking measures to “Restore Black Dignity” within Christianity, we not only help to uplift our community but also remove an obstacle that people often cite as the reason that they will not seek salvation.

    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by mrpullam.
    • This reply was modified 9 months, 2 weeks ago by mrpullam.
    #10833
    willeswilles
    Participant

    I agree with both of you. It is important to expose our youth to positive black images because all too often they see negative images. Colorism is real and extremely detrimental in black and brown communities. I love to see positive images in the media expressing black culture! The thing about this life is that we have to be just as willing to unlearn ideas and traditions that we’ve known some for a few months and some our entire lives. When you know better, you do better, hopefully.

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